Where do the days go?

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View of Gunung Palung from one of the surrounding villages

It’s been almost 2 weeks since my last post, wow! I’m not really sure where all the time went, except that I’ve been extremely busy with work. Here are some highlights:

  • Cheryl and the kids arrived! It was great to see them, her husband Tim Laman is a wildlife photojournalist for National Geographic and so he has already been here at the research station for a few weeks working on an orangutan assignment. Tim came down last Friday with his assistant Wahyu, and then the whole family was reunited on Saturday. It was a really crazy few days with them here in the house getting ready to head up to the camp in Gunung Palung National Park, but we had a good time. Gunung Palung is going to be featured on National Geographic’s blog this month, because the whole family is writing posts about their time in Borneo. The first entry is up, check it out! And if you’re interested in seeing more of Tim’s photos, follow @TimLaman on Instagram. He’s got some great shots of orangutans and field work posted.
  • I’ve been seeing more of the activities that GPOCP currently does, meeting with my staff, writing grants and reports, and starting to plan for the next few months. Last weekend I went up to one of the villages near the National Park called Harapan Mulia to attend a meeting of our Non-Timber Forest Product craftswomen. These women use leaves and other non-timber (aka no illegal logging necessary) materials that they find in the forest to make traditional crafts, which we then help them sell on the market to make money. This encourages them and the others in their village not to cut down the rainforest around them, which is valuable orangutan habitat. The main driver of this small-scale logging is the lack of an alternative livelihood, so this program is one of the methods we use to provide the village communities with a sustainable option. That’s the short version- I’ll write more about this at a later date, I’m sure. Exciting things are happening with that particular project. ANYWAY I went to the meeting, met these women, discussed their business plan, and watched them as they made their crafts. The task that day was mats made of Pandan leaves called tikar. I even learned how to weave! It It takes a lot of patience, and one mat can take anywhere from 6 hours to 6 days, depending on the size and design. Needless to say I got through about one row before my eyes were tired and I turned the weaving back over to the true artisans.
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Craftswomen making tikar mats, made entirely of leaves and other readily-available forest material

Motorbike = freedom!

  • I got a motorbike! Technically it’s borrowed, because the bike that is supposed to be mine is too hard for me to ride right now. It’s a semi-automatic meaning that it required lots of hand and foot coordination- I’m not quite up to that level yet. So in the meantime I’m borrowing a staff member’s bike because it’s automatic and easy to drive. I can finally GO places on my own! Sure beats the little pink bicycle I was riding around on (no joke).
  • Finally, I’ve decided to go to the bi-annual International Primatological Society Congress. This year it’s in Hanoi, Vietnam, the theme is conservation, and tons of orangutan people are going to be there. It’ll be a nice way to catch up with old friends, network with new ones and learn about the latest orangutan and conservation research. I’m looking forward to it, but currently a bit stressed trying to get my flights/registration/visa figured out. That will have to be Tuesday’s project, because tonight I’m going back up to the National Park area with the National Geographic journalist that is helping Tim with the orangutan story. He’s headed to the research station tomorrow and we wanted to show him a bit about the conservation program first. Busy busy as always!
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Beach on the West coast of Kalimantan- a nice place to relax and enjoy some es kelapa (iced coconut)

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